How to use a surgical face mask

UK certified and MHRA approved face masks made in Nottingham UK

Wearing a surgical face mask (Type IIR face mask) is mandatory in many health and care settings. But if surgical face masks are not used in the correct way it can jeopardise the efforts of stopping the virus to spread.

The WHO advises to make wearing a mask a normal part of your day-to-day routine and use internalise the proper use, correct storing and appropriate disposal of surgical masks.

The help you and your staff to use your type IIR face masks in the appropriate way we have summarised the WHO advise for the use of surgical face masks for you.

How to use surgical face masks, the Do’s:

  • Make sure you only use tested and MHRA certified face masks.
  • Wash your hand before touching the mask.
  • Inspect the face mask for tears and holes.
  • Find the top side, where the metal piece or stiff edge is.
  • Ensure the coloured-side face outwards.
  • Place the metal piece or stiff edge over your nose and fit with light pressure.
  • Adjust the IIR face masks to your face without leaving gaps on the sides
  • Avoid touching the face mask
  • Remove the face masks from behind the ears or head
  • Keep the used mask away from you and surfaces while removing it
  • Discard the face mask immediately after use, preferably into a closed bin.
  • Wash your hand after discarding the face masks.
How to use a surgical face mask (type IIR)
(image source: WHO – Website)

How to use surgical face mask, the Don’ts

  • Do not use a ripped or damp surgical face mask.
  • Do not wear the mask only over mouth or nose.
  • Do not wear a loose face mask.
  • Do not touch the front of the mask.
  • Do not remove the mask to talk to someone or do other things that would require touching the mask.
  • Do not leave the used face mask within the reach of others.
  • Do not reuse the mask.
How to use a surgical face mask.
(image source: WHO – Website)

And always be aware that a face mask alone cannot protect you from COVID-19. Keep a distance of at least one metre when ever possible, wash your hands frequently and thoroughly why wearing a mask.

You can find further advise on the correct use of face masks on the homepage of the Word Health Organization.

What face masks should I use?

when to wear a face mask in England

This is a question a lot of people ask themselves and there is often confusion between what a face mask is and can do and what a face covering is for.

Face coverings are for use by the general public in places where people come into contact with other people. Face coverings intent to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Face masks are PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) and have a high filtration rate to offer a higher level of protection.

Face masks are used in medical settings or by businesses.

We explain the difference between face masks and face coverings and when it is appropriate to use them.

What is the difference between a face mask and a face covering?

Face coverings:

Face coverings are intended for use by the general public and are not PPE. This means they do not have to carry a CE mark and should not be sold or used as PPE. There is no regulation for homemade face coverings. If face coverings are made with the intent to sell or supply others they must meet the regulations of the General Product Safety Regulations 2005 (GPSR).

Surgical (medical) face masks:

Surgical masks are tested and certified to EN 14683:2019+AC:2019, like the Type IIR face masks from Home Shield Products.  Surgical face masks are classified as, and have to comply with the regulations for class 1 medical devices.

Surgical face masks are intended to limit the transmission of viruses, bacteria and other infective agents. Surgical masks are intended to be a barrier to infection of others though they do offer limited protection to the wearer. Medical face masks are classified into two main types.

 Type I:

 These masks should only be used by patients and other persons to reduce the risk of spread of infections particularly in epidemic or pandemic situations. Type I masks are not intended for use by healthcare professionals in an operating room or in other medical settings with similar requirements.

Type II and Type IIR:

 These masks are mostly designed for use by healthcare professionals in an operating room or other medical settings with similar requirements. Type II is further divided according to whether or not the mask is splash resistant. The R signifies splash resistance. These products are certified under the European Medical Devices Regulation as a Class I device, so they must be CE marked based on the manufacturer’s self-declaration unless they are supplied as sterile. Home Shield Products face masks are Type IIR face masks to EN 14683:2019+AC:2019 and the face masks are tested and certified in the UK and MHRA approved.

IIR Face masks made in UK with BOX 1

For all inquiries regarding our Type IIR Face Masks please use our contact form or email us to: sales@homeshieldproductsltd.co.uk

Production of IIR Face Masks made in Nottingham has started

IIR Face masks made in UK with BOX 1

It was a challenging journey for Home Shield Products Ltd, from just the idea of providing UK made face masks to having an operating production line with a weekly capacity of 500,000 face masks.

The journey to become a certified IIR face mask production facility

Appalled by the shortage and the often substandard quality of imported face masks, in March 2020 Dr Abraze Khalique and  a few like- minded local business men developed the plan to produce high quality face masks in the UK, right here in Nottingham.

With this idea in mind Home Shield Products Ltd was founded to become a manufacturer of high quality, fully certified face masks in the UK.

Facilities and production lines to manufacture IIR face masks

The management of Home Shield Products Ltd has made substantial investment in the premises in Nottingham to transform them into a cleanroom environment with positive atmosphere pressure to ensure the highest standard for the production of surgical face masks.

Another considerable investment was made in the acquisition and installation of two production lines to manufacture type IIR face masks.

Experienced and highly qualified machine operators are employed to make sure operations run smoothly and all necessary requirements in the production of surgical face masks are not only met, but exceeded.

UK tested, certified and MHRA approved face masks

From the outset it was the aim of the company to be a reliable provider for the NHS, care homes and businesses in the UK for high quality and fully certified face masks made in the UK.

To give the maximum confidence to its customers, the dedicated management team of Home Shield Products Ltd, has decided to get the products tested not only by one but by two of the leading test facilities in the UK.

The Type IIR face masks have been tested and certified to EN 14683:2019 +AC:2019 by SGS Testing, the worlds leading testing company and 4wardTesting one of the UK’s most renowned material testing institutions.

In early October the Home Shield Products Ltd face masks received MHRA approval and production has started.

500,000 IIR face masks per week

With all the obstacles, of building a manufacturing line that not only meets all legal requirements for surgical Type IIR face masks, but also the high demands the team around Dr. Abraze has set themselves, production has started.

From mid-October both production lines are up and running with an output of 500,000 type IIR face masks per week.

If you want to know more about the company and for all business enquiries please email us on sales@homeshieldproductsltd.co.uk or call us on 0115 924 4380

Face Masks when and where to wear in England

when to wear a face mask in England

This information is according to the government advice update from the 31 July 2020.

In England, you must wear a face covering by law in the following settings:

  • public transport,
  • indoor transport hubs (airports, rail and tram stations and terminals, maritime ports and terminals, bus and coach stations and terminals),
  • shops and supermarkets (places which are open to the public and that wholly or mainly offer goods or services for retail sale or hire),
  • indoor shopping centres,
  • banks, building societies, and post offices (including credit unions, short-term loan providers, savings clubs and money service businesses).

You should wear your face covering before entering any of these and must keep it on until you leave.

For members of the public, from 8 August the places where you will have to wear a face covering will be expanded to include:

  • Funeral directors
  • Premises providing professional, legal or financial services
  • Cinemas
  • Theatres
  • Bingo halls
  • Concert halls
  • Museums, galleries, aquariums, indoor zoos or visitor farms, or other indoor tourist, heritage or cultural sites.
  • Nail, beauty, hair salons and barbers – other than where necessary to remove for treatments
  • Massage parlours
  • Public areas in hotels and hostels
  • Places of worship
  • Libraries and public reading rooms
  • Community centres
  • Social clubs
  • Tattoo and piercing parlours
  • Indoor entertainment venues (amusement arcades, funfairs, adventure activities e.g. laser quest, go-karting, escape rooms, heritage sites etc)
  • Storage and distribution facilities
  • Veterinary services.
  • Auction houses

The government recommends face coverings are worn in these settings now but this will be voluntary until 8 August, then it becomes mandatory.

The public is also strongly encouraged to wear a face covering in all enclosed public spaces where social distancing may be difficult.

Where this law does not apply

Face coverings are not required in restaurants with table service, bars, and pubs.

Face masks should be worn in indoor places not listed above where possible, especially if it is a place where you come into contact with people you do not usually meet and close contact can’t be avoided.

When can I remove my face mask?

Remove your face covering in order to eat and drink if reasonably necessary. This should be in an area that is specifically for the purposes of eating and drinking and where social distancing and infection control measures are in place.

Put the face masks on again when you leave this area.

Home Shield Products Ltd. face masks are manufactured and certified to EN14683:2019 in the UK.

For all inquires please call us on 0115 924 4380 or use the contact form.

PPE for the Park Lodge Project in Leicester

Park-Lodge-Project-PPE-Delivery hand sanitiser and face masks

The amazing charity UK Mask Force has, once again, donated our products to a good cause.  This time the recipients of our high-quality hand sanitisers and face masks are the frontline staff at the Park Lodge Project in Leicester.

Park Lodge Project was established in 1972 by local residents in the Clarendon Park near the centre of Leicester, who wanted to provide supported housing for homeless young people. The Project supports 46 homeless young people aged 16-25 years. The project has established a first class reputation and has housed well over two thousand young, single homeless people since it started. 

If you want to know more about the Park Lodge Project, here is the link to their homepage.

If you want to know more about UK Mask Force and support them in their aim to provide PPE to care homes and frontline workers please click here.

Park Lodge Project has received 100ml hand sanitisers and surgical face masks from home shield products. We guarantee the quality and quantity to supply charities, care home, NHS surgeries and businesses with the PPE to keep staff and customers safe.  

Interview With Dr Abraze Khalique From UK Mask Force

Dr Khalique UK Mask Force

We are happy to have had the opportunity to speak to Dr Khalique, the medical equipment advisor for the UK Mask Force Charity.

Dr Khalique has been working as an NHS GP for 30 years. In this time Dr Khalique has received several awards for his outstanding work (e.g. patient champion’s awards, an NHS Hero award and a Parliamentary Public Health award).

Dr Khalique, firstly can you say a few words about the UK Mask Force charity:

UK Mask Force is the result of a collaboration between military, medical and logistical partners and entrepreneurs in the UK, China and USA. It has been set up as a result of the Covid 19 pandemic and the difficulties with NHS / care home / dental front line staff struggling to get quality non-counterfeit PPE in a timely manner with adequate supplies. In addition, with my medical colleagues struggling, or getting Covid and, sadly one passing away, I felt the need to help and support our NHS colleagues in their fight to care for patients in unprecedented times. By having logistics and ‘eyes on’ Chinese factory and procuring through credible agents we have the ability to act quick and accurately in sourcing credible and reliable PPE. This is paramount as front-line staff, whether in a hospital, care home, or community care/general practice setting, need good PPE to feel confident, secure and protected against the very dangerous hazards they and their patients are facing.

Setting up something like this, in these difficult circumstances and in such a short time is a big task. How did you get involved and what was your motivation?

Meeting with my partners, who were all experienced in their respective fields, made the whole arrangement and process of setting up the charity considerably easier. Our team comprises of; our medical advisors is General Sir Louis Lillywhite (retired Surgeon General UK Armed Forces and involved with WHO Ebola Epidemic), legal – Howard Kennedy, accountacy – Mockler Accountants, Procurement – HKKA Consulting limited (Hong Kong) and Logistics – Ligentia, entrepreneurs William Ralston Saul-nanotechnologies experts , the Team was very quickly enabled to undertake relevant diligence, search and diagnostics as well as procurement actions with confidence. The aim is to raise funds to source and supply credible, quality PPE for the NHS services, Care Homes and Dentists. My motivation to support, care and protect my frontline colleagues and patients

Can you describe the challenges you face in the procurement of the right PPE and materials for the NHS and care homes?

The main issue in procuring PPE is tracing its source from factory and then authenticating the factory and regulatory compliance and certification. The PPE is being distributed to frontline healthcare workers and the public and so it is essential to avoid any counterfeit products. Furthermore, as most PPE is sourced from overseas, for example China / Europe, this comes with further reliability issues in shipping / aviation schedules. This has made it a desire to source, where possible, PPE made in the UK

Why is it so important to have a reliable partner in the UK to ensure that the PPE you deliver to care homes is up to the required standards?

Finding products in the UK and abroad is a key ability to source and deliver PPE, especially when services are struggling to get it in both a timely and adequate manner. Key to this is having the right team which can react, investigate, target and deliver to those frontline services in a predictable manner. Reliable, trustworthy partners enable us to achieve this mission and having a UK partner such as Home Shield Products to fulfil this role. It is disheartening when looking after highly infectious ill patients to run short of protective equipment that is needed. Not only does it affect patient care and service but it also affects the confidence, morale and efficiency of the carers.

Home Shield Products Ltd. is proud to meet your high standards.

Why do you value the cooperation with Home Shield Products as your supplier?

Paramount to delivering the aims of the charity within the UK we need an experienced and reliable partner to facilitate excellent PPE product sourcing and assist with UK logistics. Home Shield Products also are creating sustainability within the supply chain by taking the route of manufacturing face masks and alcohol sanitisers in the UK.

This is a great mission – to provide UK manufactured face masks. I am proud that after months of hard work the Home Shield Products type IIR face masks are now tested and certified to EN 14683:2019 +AC:2019 and approved by MRHA and production has started in October 2020.

Thank you very much Dr Khalique for this interview. We are proud to be partner of UK Mask Force and the important work they do to support care homes and the NHS in the UK.

Face Masks And Hand Sanitiser For Falcon Support Services In Loughborough

Falcoln Support Services PPE Delivery

UK Mask Force has delivered hand sanitisers and face masks, supplied by Home Shield Products, to the Falcon Support Services in Loughborough.

UK Mask Force is a charity that provides care homes, NHS GP practices and other organisations that have a need for PPE.

Falcon Support Services is a charitable organisation providing help and support for the homeless and vulnerable in Loughborough and Leicestershire.  They run the Falcon Centre, a 30 bed supported housing scheme in Loughborough. In the last 12-months 235 people have been housed there and found support and help. Additional to that their ‘Drop-In’ centre has seen over 7000 visits from vulnerable and homeless people.

Falcoln Support Services PPE Delivery

If you want to support either of these two amazing charities, just follow the links in the text above. We are delighted to work closely together with UK Mask Force and provide much needed PPE for those in need.

If you are an non-profit organisation that is in need of PPE – you can contact UK Mask Force via their homepage.

Hand Sanitiser For The Oakhaven Hospice In Lymington

Oakhaven-Hospice-UK-Mask-Force-delivery-hand-sanitiser

We are proud to see that 90 of our hand sanitisers have been received by the Oakhaven Hospice in Lymington, this time delivered by Malcolm Steward from the UK Mask Force charity. The products from Home Shield Products have been welcomed by Dr. Birch of the Oakhaven Hospice, who was very pleased with our hand sanitisers. He said: ‘They are such a handy size, it means we can keep them in our pockets so you can just use them all the time rather than having to find a wall mounted one.’

We are pleased that our 100 ml size hand sanitiser has been the right product for the Oakhaven Hospice, but should you have a need for larger we also have 250 ml and 500 ml hand sanitisers available.

As always, the dedicated team from UK Mask Force has proven that they fully understood the needs of the front-line team in this specific setting and provided, with the help of your donations, help to improve the work for this health care team.

Dunkirk Care Home Receives Face Masks And Hand Sanitiser

dunkirk-care-home-ppe-UK-Mask-Force face masks hand sanitiser

We are pleased to see that even more products from Home Shield Products have found their way to a care home.  Donations to the UK Mask Force charity have enabled them to deliver 1250 IIR Masks and 250 hand sanitisers to the  Dunkirk Care Home in Taunton.

The Dunkirk Memorial House is one of five Royal British Legion care homes in the UK and provides a dementia care unit, nursing as well as care for the armed forces community and their families.

(Photography by Johnny Fenn Photography)

Hand Sanitiser and Face Masks for Care Home

Hand Sanitiser Face mask for Care Home Bramley House

We are proud to work together with the amazing charity UK Mask Force.

Newly appointed UKMF Ambassador actress Ruth Wilson, who is pictured presenting the PPE, joined UK Mask Force director Antony Sainthill to hand over face masks and hand sanitisers, produced by Home Shield Products, to the Bramley House care home.

Ruth Wilson said: “I fully support the ambitious vision of UK Mask Force to raise funds for the procurement and delivery of reliable PPE to many neglected health care workers who are starved of supplies and funding.”

We are happy to support, together with your donations to UK Mask Force and ambassadors like Ruth Wilson, the work and care provided in care homes such as Bramley House in Wiltshire.

We provide high quality UK manufactured products and are a dependable supplier to health workers in many care homes and in the NHS.

Photography by Johnny Fenn Photography